The Long Exile

The Long Exile In 1922 An Irish American Adventurer Named Robert Flaherty Made A Film About Inuit Life In The Arctic Nanook Of The North Featured A Mythical Eskimo Hunter Who Lived In An Igloo With His Family In A Frozen Eden Nanook S Story Captured The World S Imagination Thirty Years Later, The Canadian Government Forcibly Relocated Three Dozen Inuit From The East Coast Of Hudson Bay To A Region Of The High Arctic That Was 1,200 Miles Farther North Hailing From A Land Rich In Caribou And Arctic Foxes, Whales And Seals, Pink Saxifrage And Heather, The Inuit S Destination Was Ellesmere Island, An Arid And Desolate Landscape Of Shale And Ice Virtually Devoid Of Life The Most Northerly Landmass On The Planet, Ellesmere Is Blanketed In Darkness For Four Months Of The Year There The Exiles Were Left To Live On Their Own With Little Government Support And Few Provisions.Among This Group Was Josephie Flaherty, The Unrecognized, Half Inuit Son Of Robert Flaherty, Who Never Met His Father In A Narrative Rich With Human Drama And Heartbreak, Melanie McGrath Uses The Story Of Three Generations Of The Flaherty Family The Filmmaker His Illegitimate Son, Josephie And Josephie S Daughters, Mary And Martha To Bring This Extraordinary Tale Of Mistreatment And Deprivation To Life.

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Long Exile book, this is one of the most wanted Melanie McGrath author readers around the world.

!!> BOOKS ✯ The Long Exile  ⚡ Author Melanie McGrath – Couponpromocode.us
  • Hardcover
  • 268 pages
  • The Long Exile
  • Melanie McGrath
  • English
  • 13 June 2018
  • 1400040477

10 thoughts on “The Long Exile

  1. says:

    For anyone who imagines, as I did before reading this book, that the forced relocation of indigenous people in North America was something that happened historically but not now, not in our lifetimes The Long Exile is an important wake up call The Inuit whose story McGrath tells here were finally allowed the option to leave their involuntary imprisonment on their reservation my term, not hers or theirs in the most inhospitable lands on Planet Earth other than Antarctica, in wait for i For anyone who imagines, as I did before reading this book, that the forced relocation of indigenous people in North America was something that happened historically but not now, not in our lifetimes The Long Exile is an important wake up call The Inuit whose story McGrath tells here we...

  2. says:

    Absolutely absorbing and beautifully written, this book relates the experiences of a group of Inuit who were relocated by the Canadian government from their community on the Eastern shore of Hudson Bay, to the remotest and most uninhabitable islands in the Arcti...

  3. says:

    Heartbreaking and well written My main complaint with this wonderful book is that it lacked endnotes It seems strange for a work of history written in 2006 to only have a partial bibliography, yeah But an important and great read nonetheless definitely worth your while.

  4. says:

    For a people isolated not only by geography, social custom and economic development but also by language, the Inuit have had a remarkable amount of patience with the world changing around them Unlike the other groups of Native Americans, who lashed out in retaliation at the invasive Europeans, the Inuit have always shrugged off the presence of the white men who visit their icelocked worlds After all, they usually left.But over time, that had to change at the hands of abuse Melanie McGrath has For a people isolated not only by geography, social custom and economic development but also by language, the Inuit have had a remarkable amount of patience with the world changing around them Unlike the other groups of Native Americans, who lashed out in retaliation at the invasive Europeans, the Inuit have always shrugged off the presence of the white men who visit their icelocked worlds After all, they usually left.But over time, that had to change at the hands of abuse Melanie McGrath has documented one of the straws that broke the camel s back With meticulous research and loving detail on each of the characters, she has composed a human struggle from court documents and vague letters, throwing a littlelight on the long road these people have walked to be recognized by the government that grew up beneath them.The story follows a group of Inuit fr...

  5. says:

    This is an excellent book about a terrible topic McGrath takes the first half of the book to set the scene in Inukjuak in the early 20th century, how the Inuit traditionally lived and how they had adapted to the incursion of the whites The second section deals with the forced relocation of Inujuak families to the inhospitable and nearly uninhabitable Elle...

  6. says:

    Oh dear Another book which gets me riled Well researched non fiction about the despicable forced movement of Inuit peoples from their homes on the eastern coast of Hudson Bay to the inhospitable northern Ellesmere Island resulting in starvation Political decisions made to ensure that Greenland, USA and any Scandinavian country could not go in and claim the land Justified because the Inuit it was thought, could survive without support, and the government did not want them to become dependent Oh dear Another book which gets me riled Well researched non fiction about the despicable forced movement of Inuit peoples from their homes on the eastern coast of Hudson Bay t...

  7. says:

    Beginning in 1953, and continuing throughout the remainder of that decade, the Government of Canada forcibly removed scores of Inuit some 1,200 miles away from their families and ancestral lands to the harsh, desolate High Arctic McGrath s excellent research, including interviews with survivors and government officials as well as a thorough document review, combines with her strong storytelling skills to tell a grim tale of wanton, unnecessary cruelty conducted in the name of Canadian sovereign Beginning in 1953, and continuing throughout the remainder of that decade, the Government of Canada forcibly removed scores of Inuit some 1,200 miles away from their families and ancestral lands to the harsh, desol...

  8. says:

    I loved this book Before reading this book I had just learned that the Inuit people are the same as the Eskimo I felt pretty clueless about these people and also intrigued by them This book is about the relocation of Inuit families by Canadian law enforcement to the high Artic where the environment is essentially uninhabitable Four months out of the year, there is complete and utter darkness This was done to supposedly allow the Inuit to live their traditional lifestyle of living off then l I loved this book Before reading this book I had just learned that the Inuit people are the same as the Eskimo I felt pretty clueless about these people and also intrigued by them This book is about the relocation of Inuit families by Canadian law enforcement to the high Artic where the environment is essentially uninhabitable Four months out of the year, there is complete and utter darknes...

  9. says:

    This is a compelling book about the Inuit in Canada and their cruel treatment by the government, who relocated them to the northernmost reaches of the land with promises of abundant game, when in reality there was nothing but ice Few survived, and few officials cared or would own up to any responsibility It is a shocking history For me it highlights the arrogance of governments The Inuits were used as political pawns, to inhabit the vast rea...

  10. says:

    This book describes the forcible relocation of a number of Inuit families to the high Arctic in the early 1050s in order to lend support to the Canadian claims of sovereignty to the region, including the Inuit Caucasian son of the documentary filmmaker who made Nanook of the North The f...

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