A Few Figs From Thistles

A Few Figs From ThistlesPopular Books, A Few Figs From Thistles By Edna St Vincent Millay This Is Very Good And Becomes The Main Topic To Read, The Readers Are Very Takjup And Always Take Inspiration From The Contents Of The Book A Few Figs From Thistles, Essay By Edna St Vincent Millay Is Now On Our Website And You Can Download It By Register What Are You Waiting For Please Read And Make A Refission For You

Edna St Vincent Millay was an American lyrical poet and playwright She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism and her many love affairs She used the pseudonym Nancy Boyd for her prose work This famous portrait of Vincent as she was called by friends was taken by Carl Van Vechten in 1933.

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  • A Few Figs From Thistles
  • Edna St. Vincent Millay
  • English
  • 05 August 2017

10 thoughts on “A Few Figs From Thistles

  1. says:

    Edna St Vincent Millay, originally from Maine, spent much of her creative life in and around New York City, with a period of her life also spent in Paris Her life and writings were concentrated in the first half of the 20th century, her primary literary output having been plays and poetry Her life and work were considered at the time to be creative, unconventional, brash, perceptive, and often flippant, all consistent with the literary scene in which she thrived Many of her poems seem today to be refreshing, irreverent, and incisive, perfectly compatible with social trends that have matured over the past century.This small volume of poetry was published in 1920 Most of the poems contained herein are short, often of just a few lines, and many are deep enough to reward multiple readings, each return suggesting depths and nuances at first missed or not considered This ambiguity is often part of their charm Perhaps a sense of her style and breadth can be suggested by quoting the first and last poems in the collection First FigMy candle burns at both ends It will not last the night But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends It gives a lovely light And the last of four final sonnets IVI shall forget you presently, my dear,So make the most of...

  2. says:

    FIRST FIGMY candle burns at both ends It will not last the night But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends It gives a lovely light SECOND FIGSAFE upon the solid rock the ugly houses stand Come and see my shining palace built upon the sand Page 10 RECUERDOWE were very tired, we were very merry We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry.It was bare and bright, and smelled like a stable But we looked into a fire, we leaned across a table,We lay on a hill top underneath the moon And the whistles kept blowing, and the dawn came soon.We were very tired, we were very merry We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry And you ate an apple, and I ate a pear, From a dozen of each we had bought somewhere And the sky went wan, and the wind came cold, And the sun rose dripping, a bucketful of gold.We were very tired, we were very merry,We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry.We hailed, Good morrow, mother to a shawl covered head, Page 11 And bought a morning paper, which neither of us read And she wept, God bless you for the apples and pears,And we gave her all our money but our subway fares Page 12 THURSDAYAND if I loved you Wednesday, Well, what is that to you I do not love you Thursday So much is true.And why you come complaining Is than I can see.I loved you Wedn...

  3. says:

    Cut if you will, with Sleep s dull knife,Each day to half its length, my friend, The years that Time takes off my life,He ll take from off the other end Midnight OilI stumbled upon this slim book of poetry in E book form and I m glad I did A short collection only 15 pages long, this is a nice way to familiarize yourself with Edna St Vincent Millay if you are not yet acquainted with her work I wasn t These poems are playful, lighthearted, intelligent, and at times mischievous Millay clearly shows her intent to live life to the fullest even in cases where convention might dictate otherwise fo...

  4. says:

    The Philosopher And what are you that, wanting youI should be kept awakeAs many nights as there are daysWith weeping for your sake And what are you that, missing you,As many days as crawlI should be listening to the windAnd ...

  5. says:

    RECUERDOWe were very tired, we were very merry We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry.It was bare and bright, and smelled like a stable But we looked into a fire, we leaned across a table,We lay on the hill top underneath the moon And the whistles kept blowing, and the dawn came soon.We were very tired, we were very merry We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry And you ate an apple, and I ate a pear,From a dozen of each we had bought somewhere And the sky went wan, and the wind came cold,And the sun rose dripping, a bucketful of gold.We were very tired, we were very merry,We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry.We hailed, Good morrow, mother to a shawl covered head,And bought a morning paper, which neither of us read And she wept, God bless you for the apples and the pears,And we gave her all our money but our subway fares. Found a hardback of this from...

  6. says:

    4.5 Feminist poetry from the USA in 1920 was expecting a lot of verse about the vote, I think I read, at first puzzled as to how this was feminist because it seemed so normal but that was the very thing It s not ideological preaching this attitude of taken for granted independence was remarkable then Assertive female Classical subjects like her Daphne running from Apollo weren t a staple as they have become Carol Ann Duffy, U.A Fanthorpe And whilst loving both men and women, and elegant references to non monogamy are something I d be accustomed to read of now and the Bloomsbury group may have been living similar lives to Millay s it was bold to publish about it then She has no compunction at mentioning she cried about a male lover or in including trivial and funny verses too allowing herself freer thinking than many feminist writers of the later twentieth century.The over obvious rhymes sometimes found Renascence and Other Poems, are almost gone in this second collection.Here is laughter and heartbreak and archness all in one tiny collection If I started a list of favourites it may include nearly half the table of contents I very much want a Collected Wo...

  7. says:

    We were very tired, we were very merry We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry And you ate an apple, and I ate a pear,From a dozen of each we had bought somewhere And the sky went wan, and the wind came cold,And the sun rose dripping, a bucketful of gold Millay 3

  8. says:

    A lovely book of poems I managed to find a hardcover 1922 printing which is also wonderful One of my favorite verses from The Penitent So up I got in angerAnd took a book I had, And put a ribbon in my hair To please a passing lad And, one thing there s no getting by I ...

  9. says:

    I choose A Second Fig as my favorite poem of the book Quoted here in its entirety Safe upon the solid rock the ugly houses stand Come and see my shining palace built upon the sand I ve always believed that if I had to choose between safety and a life of uncertainty I would choose the latter, knowin...

  10. says:

    I was lucky to have heard a voice recording of Edna reading these out loud years ago so whenever I re read them I can hear her in my head which is wonderful.I don t read an awful lot of poetry and I don t really know why because when I do I love it so much...

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